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Social media technologies

Question Type:
Intervention
Full Question:
For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) (P), does having a citizen CPR responder notified of the event via technology or social media (I), compared with no such notification (C), change survival to hospital discharge with good neurological outcome, survival to hospital discharge, hospital admission, ROSC, bystander CPR rates, time to first compressions (O)?
Consensus on Science:
No data related to critical or important outcomes were identified by the literature review. For the outcome of time to first shock, we identified very-low-quality evidence (downgraded for risk of bias and indirectness) from 1 case series (n=76) involving text-message alerts to lay responders within 1000 m of a suspected cardiac arrest demonstrating a median call to first shock time of 8 minutes (interquartile range, 6:35–9:49 minutes).(Zijlstra 2014, 1444) In the same study, the median time from call to first shock when emergency medical services personnel arrived first was 10:39 minutes (interquartile range, 8:18–13:23 minutes). For the outcome of first responder on scene, we identified very-low-quality evidence (downgraded for risk of bias and indirectness) from 1 case series involving computer-generated phone calls and text messages to lay responders within 500 m of a suspected cardiac arrest, demonstrating that responders notified via this system arrived first in 44.6% of suspected cardiac arrest episodes, compared with emergency medical services providers in 55.4% of the episodes.(Ringh 2011, 1514)
Treatment Recommendation:
We suggest that individuals in close proximity to a suspected OHCA who are willing and able to perform CPR be notified of the event via technology or social media (weak recommendation, very-low-quality evidence). Values, Preferences, and Task Force InsightsIn making this recommendation, we place value on the time-sensitive benefit of CPR and AED use in OHCA and the limitations of optimized emergency medical services systems to improve response times. We also recognize that there are individuals willing and able to provide BLS in most communities and these novel technologies can engage these individuals in the response to cardiac arrest outside the hospital. Although the evidence available to support this treatment recommendation is sparse, the relative benefits versus harms are judged to be in favor of the recommendation. Research into the effectiveness of these interventions is justified and required.
CoSTR Attachments:
Social medial Ev Profile table_n.docx    

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