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Resuscitation care for suspected opioid-associated emergencies

Question Type:
Intervention
Full Question:
Adults and children with suspected opioid-associated cardio / respiratory arrest in the pre-hospital setting (P), does Bystander naloxone administration (intramuscular or intranasal), in addition to standard CPR (I), compared with conventional CPR only  (C), change  (O)?
Consensus on Science:
We did not identify any published studies to determine if adding intranasal or intramuscular naloxone to conventional CPR is superior to conventional CPR alone for the management of adults and children with suspected opioid-associated cardiac or respiratory arrest in the prehospital setting. An additional search was performed to assess available evidence for overdose education and naloxone distribution programs (see BLS 891).
Treatment Recommendation:
No treatment recommendation can be made for adding naloxone to existing BLS practices for the BLS management of adults and children with suspected opioid-associated cardiac or respiratory arrest in the prehospital setting. Values, Preferences, and Task Force Insights All patients with suspected opioid-associated cardiac or respiratory arrest should receive standard BLS care, with or without the addition of naloxone. In making this recommendation, we place greater value on the potential for lives saved by recommending immediate BLS care and education, with or without naloxone, and lesser value on the costs associated with naloxone administration, distribution, or education.

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